MARKETING

Get Started. It's Free
or sign up with your email address
MARKETING by Mind Map: MARKETING

1. MARKETING INFOMATION (MI) CUSTOMER INSIGHT ( CI)

1.1. marketing research process

1.1.1. internal data

1.1.1.1. from data sources within the company’s network.

1.1.1.1.1. marketing department

1.1.1.1.2. customer service department

1.1.1.1.3. accounting

1.1.1.1.4. Operations

1.1.1.1.5. sales force

1.1.1.1.6. marketing channel partners

1.1.1.2. NOTICE

1.1.1.2.1. accessed more quickly and cheaply

1.1.1.2.2. problems

1.1.1.2.3. may be incomplete or in the wrong

1.1.1.2.4. requires highly sophisticated equipment and techniques.

1.1.2. Competitive marketing intelligence

1.1.2.1. consist of

1.1.2.1.1. systematic collection

1.1.2.1.2. analysis of publicly

1.1.2.2. about

1.1.2.2.1. consumers

1.1.2.2.2. competitors

1.1.2.2.3. development in marketplace

1.1.2.3. Benefits

1.1.2.3.1. improve strategic decision

1.1.2.3.2. assessing and tracking competitors’ actions

1.1.2.3.3. providing early warnings of opportunities and threats

1.1.2.4. activities

1.1.2.4.1. observing consumers firsthand

1.1.2.4.2. quizzing the company’s own employees

1.1.2.4.3. benchmarking competitors’ products

1.1.2.4.4. researching on the Internet

1.1.2.4.5. monitoring social media buzz

1.1.3. marketing research

1.1.3.1. systematic design, collection, analysis, and reporting

1.1.3.1.1. data relevant to a specific marketing situation

1.1.3.2. formal studies

1.1.3.2.1. provide customer and market insights

1.1.3.2.2. for specific marketing situations and decisions

1.2. marketing research process

1.2.1. defining the problem and research objectives

1.2.1.1. exploratory research

1.2.1.1.1. gather preliminary information

1.2.1.1.2. define the problem and suggest hypotheses

1.2.1.2. descriptive research

1.2.1.2.1. describing

1.2.1.3. causal research

1.2.1.3.1. test hypotheses

1.2.1.3.2. example

1.2.2. developing the research plan

1.2.2.1. secondary data

1.2.2.1.1. exists somewhere, having been collected for another purpose

1.2.2.1.2. From

1.2.2.1.3. BENEFITS

1.2.2.1.4. PROBLEMS

1.2.2.1.5. NOTIONS

1.2.2.2. primary data

1.2.2.2.1. collected for the specific purpose at hand

1.2.2.2.2. GOOD

1.2.2.2.3. FROM

1.2.2.3. Research plan outlines

1.2.2.3.1. Research Instruments

1.2.2.3.2. Research Approaches

1.2.2.3.3. Contact Methods

1.2.2.3.4. Sampling Plan

1.2.3. implementing the research plan

1.2.3.1. from

1.2.3.1.1. company’s marketing research staff

1.2.3.1.2. outside firms

1.2.3.2. watch closely

1.2.3.2.1. plan is implemented correctly

1.2.4. interpreting and reporting the findings

1.2.4.1. interpret the findings

1.2.4.2. draw conclusions

1.2.4.3. report to management

1.2.4.3.1. too much numbers and fancy statistical technique

1.2.4.3.2. present important findings

1.2.4.3.3. insights that are useful

2. DEFINING MARKETING AND THE MARKETING PROCESS

2.1. The marketing process

2.1.1. Understand the marketplace

2.1.2. customer-driven marketing strategy

2.1.3. integrated marketing program

2.1.4. profitable relationships and create customer delight

2.1.5. create profits and customer equity

2.2. UNDERSTANDING MARKET 5 core of marketplace concepts

2.2.1. Needs, wants, demands

2.2.1.1. Needs:

2.2.1.1.1. States of felt deprivation.

2.2.1.1.2. basic part of the human makeup

2.2.1.1.3. Include

2.2.1.2. Wants

2.2.1.2.1. form human needs

2.2.1.2.2. shaped by

2.2.1.2.3. Example

2.2.1.3. Demands

2.2.1.3.1. Relating to buying power

2.2.1.3.2. people demand products and services

2.2.2. market offerings

2.2.2.1. DEFINE: some combination

2.2.2.2. marketing myopia

2.2.2.2.1. When marketers focus too much on products characters rather than fulfill customer's satisfaction

2.2.3. Customer values and satisfaction

2.2.3.1. Satisfied customers

2.2.3.1.1. buy again

2.2.3.1.2. tell others about their good experiences

2.2.3.2. Dissatisfied customers

2.2.3.2.1. switch to competitors

2.2.3.2.2. disparage the product to others

2.2.4. Market

2.2.4.1. Define

2.2.4.2. customer-managed relationships.

2.2.5. Exchange and relationship

2.2.5.1. Exchange

2.2.5.2. exchange relationships

2.3. Customer driven marketing strategy

2.3.1. Select customer to serve

2.3.1.1. dividing the market into segments

2.3.1.2. selecting which segments it will go after

2.4. Integrated marketing plan and program

2.4.1. four marketing mix elements

2.4.2. product offers and creates strong brand identities

2.5. Customer relationship

2.5.1. customer relationship management

2.5.2. partner relationship management

2.6. Capturing values from customers

2.6.1. Customer loyalty and retention

2.6.1.1. Customer lifetime value

2.6.2. Growing share of customers

2.6.3. Customer equity

2.6.3.1. What Is Customer Equity?

2.6.3.2. Building the Right Relationships with the Right Customers

2.6.3.3. Customer Relationship Groups

2.6.3.3.1. Strangers

2.6.3.3.2. Butterflies

2.6.3.3.3. True friends

2.6.3.3.4. Barnacles

3. MARKETING STRATEGY BUILD CUSTOMER RELATIONSHIP

3.1. Company-wide strategic planning

3.1.1. Market-oriented mission

3.1.1.1. Mission statement

3.1.1.1.1. statement of the organization’s purpose

3.1.1.1.2. what it wants to accomplish in the larger environment.

3.1.1.2. Attention

3.1.1.2.1. meaningful and specific

3.1.1.2.2. motivating

3.1.1.2.3. emphasize the company’s strengths in the marketplace.

3.1.1.2.4. not be stated as making more sales or profits

3.1.1.2.5. Creating values for customers

3.1.2. Setting company objectives and goals

3.1.2.1. turn its mission into detailed supporting objectives for each level of management

3.1.3. Designing business profolio

3.1.4. Marketing planning

3.2. Business portfolio

3.2.1. The Boston Consulting Group Approach

3.2.1.1. Stars.

3.2.1.1.1. high-growth

3.2.1.1.2. high-share businesses or products

3.2.1.1.3. heavy investments to finance

3.2.1.2. Cash Cows

3.2.1.2.1. low-growth

3.2.1.2.2. high-share businesses or products

3.2.1.2.3. need less investment to hold their market share

3.2.1.3. Question Marks

3.2.1.3.1. low-share business units

3.2.1.3.2. high-growth markets.

3.2.1.3.3. require a lot of cash to hold their share

3.2.1.4. Dogs

3.2.1.4.1. low-growth

3.2.1.4.2. low-share businesses and products

3.2.1.4.3. enough cash to maintain

3.2.2. The Product–Market Expansion Grid

3.2.2.1. market penetration

3.2.2.1.1. current customers

3.2.2.1.2. original products

3.2.2.2. Market development

3.2.2.2.1. new markets

3.2.2.2.2. current products

3.2.2.3. Product development

3.2.2.3.1. new products

3.2.2.3.2. current markets

3.2.2.4. Diversification

3.2.2.4.1. starting up or buying businesses

3.2.2.4.2. new market

3.3. Planning marketing

3.3.1. value chain

3.3.2. Partnering with other company departments

3.3.3. Partnering with others in MKT system

3.4. Customer-driven marketing strategy

3.4.1. Market segmentation

3.4.2. Market targeting

3.4.3. Differentiation

3.4.4. Positioning

3.4.4.1. make the consumer “think” a certain way about a brand

3.5. Marketing mix

3.5.1. Product

3.5.2. Price

3.5.3. Place

3.5.4. Promotion

4. SUSTAINABLE, SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND ETTHICS

4.1. SUSTAINABLE MARKETING

4.1.1. beyond caring for the needs and wants of today’s customers.

4.1.2. concern for tomorrow’s customers in ensuring the survival and success of the business, shareholders, employees, and the broader world in which they all live.

4.1.3. “people, planet, profits.”

4.1.4. profitable customer relationships

4.2. MARKETING'S IMPACTS ON CUSTOMERS

4.2.1. High Prices

4.2.1.1. HIGH COSTS OF DISTRIBUTION

4.2.1.1.1. long-standing charge

4.2.1.2. HIGH ADVERTISING AND PROMOTION COSTS

4.2.1.3. EXCESSIVE MARKUPS

4.2.2. Deceptive Practices

4.2.2.1. Deceptive pricing

4.2.2.2. Deceptive promotion

4.2.2.3. Deceptive packaging

4.2.3. High-Pressure Selling

4.2.4. Shoddy, Harmful, or Unsafe Products

4.2.5. Planned Obsolescence

4.3. CONSUMER ACTIONS

4.3.1. Seller’s rights

4.3.1.1. Introduce any product

4.3.1.2. Charge any price

4.3.1.3. Spend any amount to promote

4.3.1.4. Spend any amount to promote

4.3.1.5. Use any buying incentive schemes

4.3.2. Use any buying incentive schemes

4.3.2.1. Use any buying incentive schemes

4.3.2.2. Expect the product to be safe

4.3.2.3. Expect the product to perform as claimed

5. ANALYZING MARKETING ENVIRONMENT

5.1. MICROENVIRONMENT

5.1.1. The company

5.1.2. The supperlier

5.1.3. Marketing intermediaries

5.1.4. Competitors

5.1.5. A public

5.1.6. Customers

5.2. MACROENVIRONMENT

5.2.1. Demography

5.2.2. Economic

5.2.2.1. major trends

5.2.2.2. consumer spending patterns

5.2.3. natural

5.2.3.1. physical environment

5.2.3.2. natural resources

5.2.4. Technological

5.2.5. political

5.2.6. cultural

6. SEGMENTATION, TARGETING AND POSITIONING

6.1. customer-driven marketing strategy

6.1.1. market segmentation

6.1.1.1. Why company do that

6.1.1.1.1. Buyer

6.1.1.1.2. Too cost financial foundation

6.1.1.2. Dividing marketing to many group of buyers

6.1.2. Targeting

6.1.2.1. Consider and evaluate each segments

6.1.2.2. Select one or more

6.1.2.3. depending on profitable potetials

6.1.3. Differentiation

6.1.3.1. How company create values for target customers

6.1.3.2. How company different with their competitors

6.1.4. Positioning

6.1.4.1. How company want to stand out in customer's mind

6.2. segmenting consumer markets

6.2.1. Geographic Segmentation

6.2.1.1. dividing market to different places

6.2.1.2. EXAM: Yukon Brewing

6.2.1.2.1. Yukoners were used to drinking beer from a can

6.2.1.2.2. changed their packaging to cans

6.2.1.2.3. the product took off

6.2.2. Demographic segmentation

6.2.2.1. Divide markets based on demographic factors

6.2.2.2. Consist of

6.2.2.2.1. age and life cycle

6.2.2.2.2. Gender

6.2.2.2.3. Household Income (HHI) segmentation

6.2.2.2.4. Ethnic and cultural group

6.2.3. Psychographic segmentation

6.2.3.1. social class

6.2.3.2. lifestyle

6.2.3.2.1. Anthropologie

6.2.3.3. personality

6.2.3.3.1. Mountain Dew

6.2.3.3.2. Coca-Cola Zero

6.2.4. Behavioural segmentation

6.2.4.1. Based on

6.2.4.1.1. knowledge

6.2.4.1.2. attitudes

6.2.4.1.3. uses

6.2.4.1.4. responses

6.2.4.1.5. product

6.2.4.2. Occasion segmentation

6.2.4.3. Benefit segmentation

6.2.4.4. User status

6.2.4.4.1. non-users

6.2.4.4.2. ex-users

6.2.4.4.3. potential users

6.2.4.4.4. firsttime users

6.2.4.4.5. regular users

6.2.4.5. Usage rate

6.2.4.5.1. Low

6.2.4.5.2. Medium

6.2.4.5.3. High

6.2.4.6. Loyalty status

6.2.4.6.1. Apple or Adidas

6.2.5. Using Multiple Segmentation Bases

6.2.6. Segmenting Business Markets

6.2.6.1. Based on

6.2.6.1.1. operating characteristics

6.2.6.1.2. purchasing approaches

6.2.6.1.3. situational factors

6.2.6.1.4. personal characteristics.

6.2.6.2. Starbucks

6.2.6.2.1. Starbucks Office Coffee Solutions

6.2.6.2.2. The Starbucks Foodservice

6.2.7. Segmenting International Markets

6.2.7.1. Coca-Cola and Sony

6.2.8. 5 requirements

6.2.8.1. Measurable

6.2.8.2. Accessible

6.2.8.3. Substantial

6.2.8.4. Differentiable

6.2.8.5. Actionable

6.3. Market targeting

6.3.1. Evaluating Market Segments

6.3.1.1. segment size and growth

6.3.1.2. segment structural attractiveness

6.3.1.3. company objectives and resources

6.4. how companies

6.4.1. Evaluating target segments

6.4.1.1. collecting and analyzing data

6.4.1.1.1. current segment sales

6.4.1.1.2. growth rates

6.4.1.1.3. expected profitability for various segments

6.4.1.2. figuring out which ones have

6.4.1.2.1. the “right” size

6.4.1.2.2. growth characteristics.

6.4.1.3. examine major factors

6.4.1.3.1. competitors

6.4.1.3.2. New entrants

6.4.1.3.3. substitute products

6.4.1.3.4. relative power of buyers

6.4.1.3.5. power of suppliers

6.4.2. Selecting target segments

6.4.2.1. Target market

6.4.2.2. different levels

6.4.2.2.1. undifferentiated marketing

6.4.2.2.2. Differentiated Marketing

6.4.2.2.3. Concentrated Marketing

6.4.2.2.4. Micro marketing

6.4.3. Choosing a Targeting Strategy

6.4.3.1. depends on

6.4.3.1.1. company resources.

6.4.3.1.2. product variability

6.4.3.1.3. market variability

6.4.3.1.4. competitors’ marketing strategies

6.4.4. differentiate and position their products

6.4.4.1. Positioning maps

6.4.4.2. consists of three steps

6.4.4.2.1. identifying Possible competitive advantages

6.4.4.2.2. choose a particular competitive advantage

6.4.4.2.3. selecting an overall positioning strategy.

6.4.4.3. Positioning satement

6.4.4.3.1. Target

6.4.4.3.2. Frame of Reference

6.4.4.3.3. Point of Difference

6.4.4.3.4. Reason to believe

7. UNDERSTANDING CUSTOMER AND BUSINESS BUYER BEHAVIORS

7.1. Consumer buyer behavior

7.1.1. Cultural Factors

7.1.1.1. 3 affecting factors

7.1.1.1.1. Culture

7.1.1.1.2. Subculture

7.1.1.1.3. Social class

7.1.1.2. crosscultural marketing

7.1.1.2.1. practice of

7.1.1.2.2. EXAM: McDonald’s

7.1.2. Social Factors

7.1.2.1. GROUP AND SOCIAL NETWORKS

7.1.2.1.1. membership groups

7.1.2.1.2. reference groups

7.1.2.1.3. Word-of-mouth influence

7.1.2.2. FAMILY

7.1.2.2.1. the most important consumer buying organization in society

7.1.2.2.2. What marketing interested in ?

7.1.2.3. ROLES AND STATUS

7.1.2.3.1. Including

7.1.2.3.2. "People usually choose products appropriate to their roles and status"

7.1.2.3.3. EXAMPLE

7.1.3. Personal Factors

7.1.3.1. AGE AND LIFE-CYCLE STAGE

7.1.3.1.1. AGE

7.1.3.1.2. LIFE STAGE

7.1.3.2. OCCUPATION

7.1.3.2.1. Blue-collar workers

7.1.3.2.2. executives

7.1.3.3. ECONOMIC SITUATION

7.1.3.3.1. What marketer do

7.1.3.4. LIFESTYLE

7.1.3.4.1. person’s pattern of living

7.1.3.4.2. Express their own psychographics

7.1.3.4.3. AIO demensions

7.1.3.4.4. In marketing

7.1.3.5. PERSONALITY AND SELF-CONCEPT

7.1.3.5.1. Personality

7.1.3.5.2. brand personality

7.1.4. Psychological Factors

7.1.4.1. MOTIVATION

7.1.4.1.1. biological

7.1.4.1.2. psychological

7.1.4.1.3. 2 types of popular theories

7.2. Business market

7.3. Buying situations

7.3.1. Straight Rebuy

7.3.2. Modified Rebuy

7.3.3. New Task

7.3.4. Systems Selling

8. DEVELOPING AND MANAGING PRODUCTS

8.1. WHAT IS PRODUCT

8.2. EXAMPLE

8.2.1. Iphone

8.2.1.1. Core value

8.2.1.2. Actual product

8.2.1.3. Augmented product

8.2.2. Technology adoption life cycle

8.2.2.1. Innovators

8.2.2.2. Early Adopters

8.2.2.3. Early Majority

8.2.2.4. Late Majority

8.2.2.5. Laggards

8.3. New product developmet

8.3.1. MOST NEW PRODUCTS FAIL

8.3.2. Idea Generatin

8.3.2.1. Internal

8.3.2.2. Crowdsourcing

8.3.2.3. External

8.3.3. Idea Screening

8.3.3.1. Keep good, drop poor

8.3.4. Concept Development and Testing

8.3.4.1. Product Concept

8.3.4.2. Concept Testing

8.3.5. Marketing strategy development

8.3.6. Business analysis

8.3.7. Product development

8.3.8. Test-Marketing

8.3.9. Commercialization

8.4. Product and Service Decisions

8.4.1. Product Decisions

8.4.1.1. Physical attributes

8.4.1.2. Packaging

8.4.1.3. Labelling

8.4.1.4. Sustainable Packaging

8.4.1.5. Product Support Services

8.4.1.6. Design And Packaging

8.4.1.7. Product Line

8.4.1.8. Product Mix

8.4.1.9. Fill product line

8.4.2. Services Marketing

8.4.2.1. How service differentiate with products

8.4.2.2. AIR CANADA

8.4.2.2.1. Intangibility

8.4.2.2.2. Variability

9. BRAND STRATEGY AND MANAGEMENT

9.1. Brand ?

9.1.1. combination

9.1.2. Trademarks

9.1.2.1. Name, symbols,

9.1.2.2. GAP changed logo but customers didn't like it

9.1.2.3. KFC

9.1.2.4. Tropicana

9.1.3. Brand relationship

9.1.4. Brand meaning

9.1.4.1. "Brand is more than names and symbols"

9.1.4.2. Volvo

9.2. Brand characteristics

9.2.1. Logos

9.2.2. Personality

9.2.2.1. Coca-Cola is traditional

9.2.2.2. Pepsi is youthful

9.2.2.3. Apple is stylish and hip

9.2.2.4. Starbucks is sophisticated

9.2.2.5. Ford is reliable

9.2.3. Equity

9.3. Brand strategy and management

9.3.1. Brand name selection

9.3.1.1. suggest something

9.3.1.2. easy to

9.3.1.2.1. pronounce

9.3.1.2.2. recognize

9.3.1.2.3. , and remember

9.3.1.3. be distinctive

9.3.1.4. be extendable

9.3.1.5. be pronounceable in many language

9.3.1.6. registration and protection as a trademark.

9.3.2. Brand positioning

9.3.3. Brand sponsorship

9.3.3.1. National brands

9.3.3.1.1. Samsung

9.3.3.2. Private brands

9.3.3.3. Licensing

9.3.3.3.1. Licensing Expo

9.3.3.4. Co-branding

9.3.3.4.1. CIBC and Air Canada joined forces to create the Aeroplan Visa card

9.3.3.5. Brand development

9.3.3.5.1. Line extensions

9.3.3.5.2. Brand extensions

9.3.3.5.3. Multibranding

9.3.3.5.4. New Brands

9.3.3.5.5. Ongoing brand management

9.4. Brand communications

9.4.1. Brand touchpoints

9.4.2. Brand experience

9.4.3. Brand Icon

9.4.3.1. Volkswagen Beetle and a Corvette Stingray.

9.4.3.2. Coca-Cola’s red and white swoosh

9.4.4. Brand characters

9.4.5. Brand Ambassadors

9.4.6. Brand Stories

9.4.7. Branded Content

9.4.8. Branded Entertainment

9.4.9. Brand and social media

9.4.10. Brand Advocates

10. COMMUNICATING CUSTOMER VALUES: ADVERTISING AND PR

10.1. The promotion mix

10.1.1. Advertising

10.1.1.1. Broadcast

10.1.1.2. Print

10.1.1.3. Internet

10.1.1.4. Mobile

10.1.1.5. Ourdoor

10.1.2. Sales promotion

10.1.2.1. Discount

10.1.2.2. Coupouns

10.1.2.3. Display

10.1.2.4. Demonstration

10.1.3. Personal selling

10.1.3.1. Sales representation

10.1.3.2. trade show

10.1.3.3. Incentive program

10.1.4. Public relations

10.1.4.1. Sponsorship

10.1.4.2. Event

10.1.4.3. Webpage

10.1.5. Direct and digital marketing

10.1.5.1. Mail

10.1.5.2. Catalogue

10.1.5.3. Online and Social Media

10.1.5.4. Mobile Marketing

10.2. Integrated marketing communications

10.2.1. New Marketing communication model

10.2.1.1. consumers are changing

10.2.1.2. marketing strategies are changing

10.2.1.3. digital technology

10.2.2. Characters

10.2.2.1. recognizing all touch points

10.2.2.2. company’s messages and images

10.3. Shaping the overall promotion mix

10.3.1. Promotion tools

10.3.1.1. ADVERTISING

10.3.1.1.1. Advantage

10.3.1.1.2. Disadvantage

10.3.1.2. PERSONAL SELLING

10.3.1.2.1. Advantage

10.3.1.2.2. Disadvantage

10.3.1.3. SALES PROMOTION

10.3.1.3.1. Advantage

10.3.1.3.2. Disadvantage

10.3.1.4. PUBLIC RELATIONS

10.3.1.4.1. Advantage

10.3.1.5. DIRECT AND DIGITAL MARKETING

10.3.1.5.1. Advantage

10.3.2. Promotion strategies

10.3.2.1. push strategy

10.3.2.2. pull strategy

10.4. Advertising

10.4.1. setting advertising objectives

10.4.1.1. Informative advertising

10.4.1.2. Persuasive advertising

10.4.1.3. comparative advertising

10.4.1.4. Reminder advertising

10.4.2. setting the advertising budget

10.4.2.1. affordable method

10.4.2.2. Percentage-of-Sales Method

10.4.2.3. Competitive-Parity Method

10.4.2.4. Objective-and-Task Method

10.4.3. developing advertising strategy

10.4.3.1. message decisions

10.4.3.1.1. BREAKING THROUGH THE CLUTTER

10.4.3.1.2. MERGING ADVERTISING AND ENTERTAINMENT

10.4.3.1.3. MESSAGE STRATEGY

10.4.3.1.4. MESSAGE EXECUTION

10.4.3.1.5. CONSUMER-GENERATED CONTENT

10.4.3.2. media decisions

10.4.3.2.1. determining reach, frequency, impact, and engagement

10.4.3.2.2. choosing among major media types;

10.4.3.2.3. selecting specific media vehicles

10.4.3.2.4. choosing media timing

10.4.4. evaluating advertising campaigns

10.4.5. Organizing for advertising

10.5. PR

10.5.1. Function

10.5.1.1. Press relations

10.5.1.2. Product Publicity

10.5.1.3. Public affairs

10.5.1.4. Lobbying

10.5.1.5. Investor relations

10.5.1.6. Developments

10.5.2. Tools

10.5.2.1. Special events

10.5.2.2. Written materials

10.5.2.3. News

10.5.2.4. Speeches

11. 14. PERSONAL SELLING AND SALES PROMOTION

11.1. Personal selling

11.1.1. Salesperson

11.1.2. The role of salesforce

11.1.2.1. Link company with its customes

11.1.2.2. Coordinating Marketing and Sales

11.2. Managing the sales force

11.2.1. strategy and structure

11.2.1.1. Structure

11.2.1.1.1. territorial

11.2.1.1.2. product

11.2.1.1.3. customer

11.2.1.2. Size

11.2.1.3. Issues

11.2.1.3.1. Outside

11.2.1.3.2. Inside

11.2.1.3.3. Team

11.2.2. Recruiting and selecting

11.2.3. Training

11.2.3.1. Training programs

11.2.4. Compensations

11.2.4.1. a fixed amount

11.2.4.2. , a variable amount

11.2.4.3. expenses

11.2.4.4. fringe benefits

11.2.5. Supervising

11.2.5.1. identify target customers and set call objectives

11.2.6. motivation

11.2.6.1. sales quotas

11.2.7. Evaluating

11.2.7.1. sales reports

11.2.7.2. call reports

11.2.7.3. expense reports

11.3. Selling digitally

11.3.1. Benefits

11.3.1.1. more efficient, cost-effective, and productive

11.3.2. Disadvantages

11.3.2.1. For starters, they’re not cheap.

11.3.2.2. such systems can intimidate low-tech salespeople or clients

11.4. Personal selling process

11.4.1. Prospecting and Qualifying

11.4.1.1. prospecting

11.4.1.2. qualify leads

11.4.2. Preapproach

11.4.3. Approach

11.4.4. Presentation and Demonstration

11.4.5. Handling Objections

11.4.6. Closing

11.4.7. Follow up

11.5. Sale promotion

11.5.1. The rapid growth of sale promotion

11.5.1.1. 1. inside the company

11.5.1.2. 2. externally

11.5.1.3. advertising efficiency has declined

11.5.1.4. consumers

11.5.2. Objectives

11.5.2.1. consumer promotions

11.5.2.2. trade promotions

11.5.2.3. Business promotions

11.5.3. Major tools

11.5.3.1. Consumer promotions

11.5.3.1.1. Samples

11.5.3.1.2. coupons

11.5.3.1.3. refunds

11.5.3.1.4. premiums

11.5.3.1.5. point-of- purchase displays

11.5.3.1.6. promotional products

11.5.3.1.7. Contests, sweepstakes, and games

11.5.3.1.8. event marketing

11.5.3.2. Trade Promotions

11.5.3.2.1. discount

11.5.3.2.2. allowance

11.5.3.2.3. free goods,

11.5.3.2.4. push money

11.5.3.2.5. specialty advertising items

11.5.3.3. Business Promotions

11.5.3.3.1. conventions and trade shows

11.5.3.3.2. A sales contest

11.5.4. Developing

11.5.4.1. determine the size of the incentive.

11.5.4.2. set conditions for participation.

11.5.4.3. how to promote and distribute the promotion

11.5.4.4. length of the promotion