Netiquette and Civility in the Online Classroom

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Netiquette and Civility in the Online Classroom by Mind Map: Netiquette and Civility in the Online Classroom

1. Emoji's/ Emoticon

1.1. emoticon, a visual representation of a facial expression using punctuation marks, numbers and letters;-)

1.1.1. The Emoticon. (2014). In J. Boulton, 100 ideas that changed the web. London, UK: Laurence King. Retrieved from http://ezproxy.apus.edu/login?url=http://search.credoreference.com.ezproxy2.apus.edu/content/entry/lkingideas/the_emoticon/0

1.2. This article is about an experiment on the effect of using emoticons in writing . Basically how you can use emoticons to strengthen the intent of your word usage or how it can strengthen the meaning and feelings. There is a good description of emoticons and their function to help represent the non-verbal communication that you get in face to face interaction. It explains the different emoticons and uses of those, referring to what they can represent and how they can change the conversation. The study that was conducted to test the use of emoticons gave some great information that can be used in my research as well. It talked about how if you have a negative message, but added a wink at the end it was so bad. Also that if you are sending a positive message and a smiley face it was extremely well received. I also got some information on emoticons helping portray sarcasm.

1.2.1. Derks, D., Bos, A., &Grumbkow, J. (2007). Emoticons and Online Message Interpretation. Social Science Computer Review, 26(3), 379-388. doi: 10.117/0894439307311611

1.3. Early examples, used by telegraph operators, include ‘73’ meaning ‘best regards’ and ‘88’ meaning ‘love and kisses’.

1.3.1. The Emoticon. (2014). In J. Boulton, 100 ideas that changed the web. London, UK: Laurence King. Retrieved from http://ezproxy.apus.edu/login?url=http://search.credoreference.com.ezproxy2.apus.edu/content/entry/lkingideas/the_emoticon/0

1.4. The convention caught on and spread to other universities and research centres. The Smiley and other emoticons, like the wink;-), grin:-D and tongue out:-P were very quickly in common use on bulletin boards across the internet. In the mid-’80s, Japanese internet users popularized a style of emojis that did not involve tilting your head, such as (*_*) and (^.^). Other examples include a wink (^_-) and confusion (@[email protected]), while a stressful situation is represented by (-_-;), the semi-colon representing sweat! When Web chat took off in the mid-’90s, emoticons evolved into images. Instant messaging services such as ICQ and AOL Instant Messenger started offering a wide range of icons that could be inserted into text at the click of a mouse. In 1997, Franklin Loufrani's son, Nicolas created a dictionary of animated GIF icons, based on the Smiley, to replace text-based emoticons. There are now over 2,000 icons in this dictionary and, to the annoyance of many, modern platforms often autoreplace text-based emoticons with these animated images.

1.4.1. The Emoticon. (2014). In J. Boulton, 100 ideas that changed the web. London, UK: Laurence King. Retrieved from http://ezproxy.apus.edu/login?url=http://search.credoreference.com.ezproxy2.apus.edu/content/entry/lkingideas/the_emoticon/0

2. Sarcasm

2.1. Definition: (1550) 1 : a sharp and often satirical or ironic utterance designed to cut or give pain 2a : a mode of satirical wit depending for its effect on bitter, caustic, and often ironic language that is usu. directed against an individual b : the use or language of sarcasm syn see wit

2.1.1. Sarcasm. (2012). In Merriam-Webster's collegiate(R) dictionary. Springfield, MA: Merriam-Webster. Retrieved from http://ezproxy.apus.edu/login?url=http://search.credoreference.com.ezproxy2.apus.edu/content/entry/mwcollegiate/sarcasm/0

2.2. When people want to be sarcarstic in writing they can use "punctuation" to express this. pg 28

2.2.1. Haiman, J. (1998). Talk Is Cheap : Sarcasm, Alienation, and the Evolution of Language. Cary, NC, USA: Oxford University Press, USA. Retrieved from http://www.ebrary.com

2.3. This book has a lot of information on how people communicate. It has different views on how certain things can be perceived depending on how they are presented. For my research I was focusing on sarcasm in this book. Specifically the punctuation that people use and how it can be perceived differently. Also how different words used to describe the same thing give the reader a better understanding of exactly how the writer was feeling. I also looked at the difference between talking in person and sarcasm and writing sarcasm. It was interesting to find out how much people rely on human emotions human tales to feel out how they mean something when they say it.

2.3.1. Haiman, J. (1998). Talk is Cheap:Sarcasm, Alienations, and the Evolution of Language. New York, NY: Oxford University Press, USA.

2.4. Different words that we use also help us to express what we are really trying to convey. Such as the reading suggest saying "It's Hot" or "Whew" also the example was given "that hurts" or "Ouch" pg 5

2.4.1. Haiman, J. (1998). Talk Is Cheap : Sarcasm, Alienation, and the Evolution of Language. Cary, NC, USA: Oxford University Press, USA. Retrieved from http://www.ebrary.com

2.5. One thing that can differ from writing sarcarstically and face to face sarcasm is the use of the 1st and 2nd finger to do air quotes. pg 12

2.5.1. Haiman, J. (1998). Talk Is Cheap : Sarcasm, Alienation, and the Evolution of Language. Cary, NC, USA: Oxford University Press, USA. Retrieved from http://www.ebrary.com

3. Communication

3.1. The world changed with the birth of the World Wide Web on August 6, 1991.

3.1.1. Weckerle, A. (2013). Civility in the digital age: How companies and people can triumph over haters, trolls, bullies, and other jerks. Pearson Education. Retrieved from http://proquestbus.safaribooksonline.com.ezproxy2.apus.edu/book/communications/9780133134995/copyright-page/copyright_html

3.2. It's not just students that need help with the civility of online discussions. Instructors must pay attention to what they are saying as well. In their study 60% of the students would report rude, impolite, or unkind communication from instructors.

3.2.1. Rieck, S., & Crouch, L. (2007). Connectiveness and civility in online learning. Nurse Education in Practice, 7(6), 425-32. doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nepr.2007.06.006

3.3. Recommendations for increased civility. The following recommendations for increased connectiveness and civility in online courses derive from our findings. 1. Wherever possible, meet the students face-toface at least once during the course. Face-toface may be broadly defined as in person, over interactive television, or via computer videoconferencing such as Elluminate. 2. Share personal experiences and encourage online socialization in discussions, chats, emails, and possibly blogs, or wikis. Create an autobiographical discussion area where students and faculty post photographs and share their stories. 3. Post the schedule for answering emails, phone calls, and grading assignments. Let the students know if you will be offline or otherwise unable to follow your schedule. 4. Provide feedback, including grades, promptly. 5. Post guidelines for civil communication and give examples. 6. Tell students that civility applies to both students and faculty. 7. Moderate discussions frequently and address offensive communication promptly, privately, and perspicaciously. Many times the sender does not actually intend to be rude; people send messages in a hurry and do not take the time to consider the ‘‘tone’’ (sounding curt or brusque) of their messages. 8. Remind students always to review emails, discussions, and chat communication for tone before sending. Suggest that they wait 12 hours before sending a response to someone who has angered them. 9. Follow the policies yourself and review your own communication for tone.

3.3.1. Rieck, S., & Crouch, L. (2007). Connectiveness and civility in online learning. Nurse Education in Practice, 7(6), 425-32. doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nepr.2007.06.006

3.4. This article is about the civility of online users. Basically this article speaks about the way one person speaks catches on in online forums. The term used in the article is “flaming.” Mr. Minerd speaks of how people can say what they want because you can’t be physically abused in cyberspace. How there is a sense of safety to be able to speak your mind. He speaks how people are more common to try and be polite and us emoticons to lighten the information. Something else that was very interesting in the article was how he said that if a cyberspace is unfiltered is will eventually basically fizzle out.

3.4.1. Minerd, J. (2000). The Rise of Cyber Civility. The Futurist, 6-6.

4. Definitions

4.1. Netiquette- (1982)etiquette governing communication on the Internet

4.1.1. Netiquette. (2012). In Merriam-Webster's collegiate(R) dictionary. Springfield, MA: Merriam-Webster. Retrieved from http://ezproxy.apus.edu/login?url=http://search.credoreference.com.ezproxy2.apus.edu/content/entry/mwcollegiate/netiquette/0

4.2. Civility-(1533) 1 archaic : training in the humanities 2 a : civilized conduct; esp : courtesy politeness b : a polite act or expression

4.2.1. Civility. (2012). In Merriam-Webster's collegiate(R) dictionary. Springfield, MA: Merriam-Webster. Retrieved from http://ezproxy.apus.edu/login?url=http://search.credoreference.com.ezproxy2.apus.edu/content/entry/mwcollegiate/civility/0

4.3. This is book is full of any and all definition I may need for this assignment. I wanted to get the definition for civility and netiquette out of the dictionary. When I was picking my topic I had to look back at the definition of these 2 to remember what they were in the first place. I also pulled a few more definitions from the dictionary that I thought would be helpful in my paper, such as, sarcasm. If there is anything else that I feel requires a definition I can just refer back to this reference.

4.3.1. Credo, R. (2003). Merriam-Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary (11th ed.). Springfield, MA: Merriam-Webster.